Monthly Archives: September 2016

Deadly foods you likely have in your kitchen

What are some of the deadliest foods the world has ever seen? Poisonous or harmful by design, not accident, and something that has us questioning our sanity when we choose to take a bite?

1. Fruit Seeds

Like apples, cherry pits contain a type of hydrogen cyanide called prussic acid. Don’t go eating a cup of ground pits, or peach and apricot pits for that matter.

2. Rhubarb

Rhubarb leaves contain oxalic acid, which causes kidney stones. It’ll take 11 pounds of leaves to be fatal, but much less to make you seriously ill.

3. Nutmeg

Nutmeg is actually a hallucinogenic. Yes, you can trip on it, but it’s said that eating just 0.2 oz of nutmeg could lead to convulsions, and 0.3 oz could lead to seizures. Eating one whole will supposedly lead to a type of “nutmeg psychosis,” which includes a sense of impending doom.

4. Potatoes

Glycoalkaloids, also found in nightshade, can be found in the leaves, stems, and sprouts of potatoes. It can also build up in the potato if it’s left too long, especially in the light. Eating glycoalkaloids will lead to cramping, diarrhea, confused headaches, or even coma and death. It’s said that just 3 to 6 mg per kilogram of body weight could be fatal. Avoid potatoes with a greenish tinge.

5. Almonds

There are two variations of almonds, sweet almonds and bitter almonds. The bitter ones supposedly contain relatively large amounts of hydrogen cyanide. It’s said that even eating just 7 – 10 raw bitter almonds can cause problems for adults, and could be fatal for children.

6. Raw Honey

Because it doesn’t go through the pasteurization process in which harmful toxins are killed, unpasteurized honey often contains grayanotoxin. That can lead to dizziness, weakness, excessive sweating, nausea, and vomiting that last for 24 hours. Typically just one tablespoon of concentrated grayanotoxin can cause the symptoms above. Consuming multiple tablespoons would be a bad idea.

7. Tomatoes

The stems and leaves of tomatoes contain alkali poisons that can cause stomach agitation. Unripe green tomatoes have been said to have the same effect. You would need to consume vast quantities for it to be fatal. Not exactly high-risk, but you might avoid eating tomato leaves.

8. Tuna

The danger in tuna is the mercury that the fish absorbs. Once in your body, mercury will either pass through your kidneys, or travel to your brain and supposedly drive you insane. The FDA recommends children and pregnant women do not consume tuna at all. While it’s unlikely that eating a massive amount of tuna in one sitting will kill you, it’s a good idea to monitor your weekly intake.

9. Cassava

The leaves and roots of cassava are surprisingly rich in cyanide. By this point, we may as well wish cyanide were the most delicious, sumptuous substance on the planet if we had to die to enjoy a bite… there is not much in the way of flavor, though. Cassava is a tropical vegetable originally from South America, but has gained popularity in Africa, particularly for its juice, which can be fermented to produce a drink called piwarry.

10. Cashews

Raw cashews you might find in a supermarket are not actually raw, as they’ve been steamed to remove the urushiol, a chemical also found in poison ivy. This chemical can cause the same effect as poison ivy, or poison oak. High levels of urushiol can supposedly prove fatal. People who are allergic to poison ivy are likely to have a fatal allergic reaction to eating actual raw cashews.

Start eating dark chocolate

Healthy food is a standout amongst the most essential elements for keeping the body to keep it sound and fit. These days, a large number of us who couldn’t care less about what is required by the body and can just consider cause of totality just at breakfast, lunch and supper. Indeed, the human body needs an assortment of essential supplements contained in the nourishment expended for wellbeing. Things being what they are, what sustenance was appropriate and best to guarantee that the body is constantly sound for the duration of the day?

Choosing nutritious foods and contain a variety of nutrients to the body is easy bother. This is because, different types of food in consumption usually contain nutrients that are good for only one organ. So it is very important to know the different types of food that is needed by all the organs of your body. Health tips, here’s the best food for a healthy body

 1. Different types of fruits. Fruits are excellent for nourishing your body. This is because, various fruits are a source of fiber and vitamin C which serves to keep the immune system to keep it healthy, fit and fit throughout the day.
Various types of fish. This is because, different types of fish such as tuna and sardines contain lots of omega 3 fatty acids Omega 3 fatty acid that serves to maintain the health of your heart organ.

2. Assorted greens. Spinach is one very important food for the nutritional requirements needed by the organs of the brain. This is because, spinach contain vitamin B9 that play a role in improving memory skills associated with intelligence itself.

 3. Carrot. This is one food that is needed by the body to nourish the organs khususunya your vision. This is because, the carrot is a source of vitamin A and beta carotene which acts kebuhan sufficient nutrition for you who want a healthy eye organ.

4. Avocado, one fruit is also very good for maintaining a healthy body, especially your kidneys. This is because, avocado is one of the foods that contain very high source of dietary fiber. So for a healthy kidney, begin loved the avocado from now.

 5. Mustard greens. This is one kind of vegetable that is excellent consumed to keep the liver in order to function optimally. Various other food was very good to nourish the liver that is under the red and white onions, cabbage, soy and red wine.

6. Dark chocolate, This is one of the foods that are excellent for keeping your blood pressure remained normal. So for those of you who are afraid of the rise and fall of blood pressure, so start eating dark chocolate.

Organic food as meaning earth friendly?

Organic is fundamentally a marking term that is utilized on a wide assortment of nourishments that have been created through techniques and practices affirmed by the U.S. Division of Agriculture (USDA) and its National Organics Program (NOP). Natural is likewise one of the absolute best strides you can take to shield the nature of your nourishment. As a rule, natural is likewise great stride for the earth.

Many people think about “organic” as meaning “earth friendly.” Even though this meaning often holds true, it doesn’t always. Organic regulations focus on farming practices and food production steps that can be monitored and controlled to decrease risk of food contamination and improve food quality. But for the most part, organic regulations simply do not try to address more complicated issues involving the earth and sustainability.

Here is one simple example of the difference between the focus of organic regulations and a focus on sustainability. In the U.S., we currently plant about 92 million acres of corn, 78 million acres of soybeans, and 57 million acres of wheat. Ecologists view these 227 million acres and the way they are planted as non-sustainable. Many factors combine to make our current planting of corn and soybeans and wheat non-sustainable. Included are factors like natural water cycles and natural mineral cycles in North America and their inability to accommodate the 227 million acres of these three crops as currently cultivated. The USDA’s organics program does not address or evaluate the sustainability of these crop acres. The program limits its focus to the farming steps that would be needed in order for all 227 million acres of corn and soybeans and wheat to be certified as organic. For example, USDA organic guidelines would prohibit use of genetic engineering, fertilization with sewage sludge, and irradiation on any of these acres. Such changes would most likely improve the quality of the crops and the quality of the land. But the practice of planting 227 million acres with these three crops would still be non-sustainable, and this non-sustainability would not matter from the USDA’s perspective. Provided that USDA organic requirements were met, these crops would be labeled organic regardless of their sustainability. The bottom line here is simple: organic food production is better for the environment and better for our health than conventional food production methods, but important earth-related questions like sustainability are not typically addressed in organic regulations and might not be furthered by adoption of organic standards.

Of special importance in organics are the “big three.” Genetic engineering, irradiation, and sewage sludge are sometimes referred to as “the big three” by commentators on the National Organics Program, since they are practices that can have an especially problematic impact on health and the environment. The “big three” have always been – and are still – prohibited by organic regulations. Along with prohibition of these three practices, however, a wide variety of other practices are prohibited in production of organic food. For example, most synthetic chemicals (including most synthetic pesticides, herbicides, and fertilizers) are prohibited by organic regulations. All off these prohibitions in organic food production are important. They help to safeguard the quality of our food and to reduce our health risk from food contaminants.

Black pepper

A squeeze of black pepper is added to practically every kind of formula possible. Once utilized as money and exhibited to the divine beings as a hallowed offering, it is lucky this most mainstream of flavors is accessible consistently.

Dark pepper originates from the pepper plant, a smooth woody vine that can grow up to 33 feet in hot and moist tropical atmospheres. They start to shoulder little white grouped blooms following 3 to 4 years and form into berries known as peppercorns. Ground peppercorns deliver the flavor we call pepper.

Improve Digestion and Promote Intestinal Health

Black pepper (Piper nigrum)stimulates the taste buds in such a way that an alert is sent to to the stomach to increase hydrochloric acid secretion, thereby improving digestion. Hydrochloric acid is necessary for the digestion of proteins and other food components in the stomach. When the body’s production of hydrochloric acid is insufficient, food may sit in the stomach for an extended period of time, leading to heartburn or indigestion, or it may pass into the intestines, where it can be used as a food source for unfriendly gut bacteria, whose activities produce gas, irritation, and/or diarrhea or constipation.

Black pepper has long been recognized as a carminitive, (a substance that helps prevent the formation of intestinal gas), a property likely due to its beneficial effect of stimulating hydrochloric acid production. In addition, black pepper has diaphoretic (promotes sweating), and diuretic (promotes urination) properties.

Black pepper has demonstrated impressive antioxidant and antibacterial effects–yet another way in which this wonderful seasoning promotes the health of the digestive tract. And not only does black pepper help you derive the most benefit from your food, the outer layer of the peppercorn stimulates the breakdown of fat cells, keeping you slim while giving you energy to burn.

How to Select and Store

Black pepper is available whole, crushed or ground into powder. To ensure best flavor, buy whole peppercorns and grind them yourself in a mill just before adding to a recipe. In addition to superior flavor, buying whole peppercorns will help to ensure that you are purchasing unadulterated pepper since ground pepper is oftentimes mixed with other spices. Whole peppercorns should be heavy, compact and free of any blemishes.

Even through dried herbs and spices like black pepper are widely available in supermarkets, you may want to explore the local spice stores in your area. Oftentimes, these stores feature an expansive selection of dried herbs and spices that are of superior quality and freshness than those offered in regular markets. Just like with other dried spices, when purchasing black pepper try to select that which is organically grown since this will give you more assurance that it has not been irradiated (among other potential adverse effects, irradiating black pepper may lead to a significant decrease in its vitamin C content.)

Black pepper should be kept in a tightly sealed glass container in a cool, dark and dry place. Whole peppercorns will keep almost indefinitely, while ground pepper will stay fresh for about three months. Pepper can also be frozen although this will make its flavor more pronounced.

A Few Quick Serving Ideas

  • Coat steaks with crushed peppercorns before cooking to create the classic dish, steak au poivre.
  • As the pungent taste of black pepper is a natural complement to the deep, berry-like flavor of venison, use it to flavor this meat when preparing venison steaks or venison stews.
  • Keep a pepper mill on your dining table so that you can add its intense spark to a host of different recipes that you prepare.
  • Olive oil, lemon juice, salt and cracked pepper make a delicious salad dressing.