Monthly Archives: October 2016

Food combining good for health and weight loss

Steak and potatoes, fish noodle goulash, fried eggs with toast – these great American suppers are additionally exemplary cases of why the Standard American Diet is making us fatter and more inclined to infection. Subsequent to eating one of those customary American suppers, you may encounter bloating or feel gassy, got dried out or tired. No big surprise! They disregard every one of the standards of food combining.

Many diet companies, like Weight Watchers and Jenny Craig, tell you to eat less and exercise more, with little regard to what you actually combine together in your stomach. What they don’t know is that what happens in your stomach and digestive tract is important and can be the key to long-term health and weight loss!

Many years ago, our ancestors worked hard at physical jobs and returned home each day to eat big meals of meat, breads, cheeses, and even sweets with no adverse effects. They had iron stomachs and digested everything. Our ancestors also had healthier inner ecosystems. A healthy inner ecosystem is made up of the friendly microflora (good bacteria) that reside in our intestines and keep us healthy and strong. A healthy inner ecosystem also means more beneficial microflora helping you digest the foods you eat.

Over time, the introduction of antibiotics, pasteurization, and processed foods, along with a lifestyle of constant stress, has damaged our inner ecosystems. An unhealthy inner ecosystem can lead to fatigue, poor health, and a digestive tract that functions inefficiently.

Today, more than ever, we need to take extra special care of our bodies because they have never been more under-nourished and over-stressed.

The good news is that you can eat your way to better health — and achieve a naturally slim body at the same time. The Body Ecology system of health and healing teaches that it’s more than just what you eat; it’s also how you eat. The “how” is indeed just as important, and Body Ecology provides a roadmap for how to eat your way to healt.

Food combining is the little-known secret to eating that enhances your digestion to give you energy and to help you lose weight and keep it off.

The body ecology way with food combining

The way toward processing every supper takes a lot of vitality, so you need to expand your capacity to process or your “stomach related fire.” But what happens if your absorption is not working appropriately, similar to such a large number of Americans today?

The undigested sustenance remains in your stomach related tract and festers, making a poisonous domain that makes your blood more acidic and permits yeast, infections, disease cells, and parasites to develop inside you. Generally, your internal biological system is harmed, and you are more inclined to ailment.

Appropriate nourishment consolidating is an arrangement of eating sustenances that join together productively to help absorption so that your stomach related tract does not need to work so difficult to give you the supplements you requirement for vitality. You can take in the nuts and bolts with three basic rules.

1. Eat Fruits Alone on an Empty Stomach

For anyone just starting on the Body Ecology program, we recommend avoiding most fruits — they have a high concentration of natural sugars that encourage the growth of yeast and other pathogens.

The exceptions are sour fruits like lemons and limes, unsweetened juices from cranberries and black currants, and pomegranates. These fruits are very low in sugars and are safe to eat, even in the initial, more limited phase of the program.

Once your inner ecosystem is restored (usually within three months of remaining on Stage 1 of The Diet), you can introduce other low-sugar fruits like grapefruit and kiwis, as well as pineapple, blueberries, and strawberry. These sour fruits combine best with kefir and yogurt made from milk and sprouted seeds and nuts. Nuts, seeds, and dairy foods including cheese are called “protein fats” because they truly are a protein and a fat combined together by nature.

In the kitchen: Start your morning with a glass of warm water and lemon juice to hydrate your body and cleanse and tone your digestive system. Lemon and lime juice can be eaten with animal protein for flavor and to enhance digestion.

2. Eat Proteins with Non-Starchy Vegetables and/or Ocean Vegetables

When you eat proteins like poultry, fish, meat, and eggs, your stomach secretes hydrochloric acid and the enzyme pepsin to break down the food in a highly acidic environment. When you eat starches like potatoes or bread, your stomach secretes the enzyme ptyalin to create an alkaline condition.

If you eat proteins and starches together, they tend to neutralize each other and inhibit digestion. The poorly-digested food travels through the digestive tract, reaching the intestines, where it putrefies and causes your blood to become acidic. It also provides a welcome environment for disease-causing pathogens!

To keep this from happening, avoid combining proteins and starches (including grains, like rice, and starchy vegetables, like potatoes) in the same meal. Instead, have non-starchy vegetables and ocean vegetables with your protein meals to achieve optimal digestion. Taking digestive enzymes can also help the body to better break down protein at each meal.

Non-starchy vegetables include: Leafy greens, broccoli, asparagus, cauliflower, carrots, bok choy, cabbage, celery, lettuces, green beans, garlic, fennel, onions, chives, turnips, sprouts, red radish, yellow squash, zucchini, cucumber, beets.

Non-starchy vegetables and ocean vegetables digest well in acid or alkaline environments, so they go with anything: proteins, oils and butter, grains, starchy vegetables, lemons and limes, and soaked and sprouted nuts and seeds.

In the kitchen: Pair poached fish with stir-fried vegetables, roasted chicken with a leafy green salad and/or a non-starchy vegetable soup. Or try a salad that has veggies that are steamed and chilled (broccoli, cauliflower, green beans, plus also a variety of raw vegetables, like shredded carrots, cucumber, or yellow squash), with lightly grilled salmon and a lemon-garlicy dressing.

3. Eat Grains and Starchy Vegetables with Non-Starchy and/or Ocean Vegetables

There are four grain-like seeds on The Body Ecology Program: amaranth, quinoa, buckwheat, and millet. These ancient grains are high in protein, gluten-free, and rich in B vitamins, and they feed the beneficial bacteria in your inner ecosystem.

Starchy vegetables include: Acorn and butternut squash, lima beans, peas, corn, water chestnuts, artichokes, and red-skinned potatoes (red-skinned potatoes are the only potatoes included in the Body Ecology program because they have fewer sugars than other kinds of potatoes).

In the kitchen: Make hearty millet casserole with a green leafy salad and yellow squash sautéed in butter. Or try acorn squash stuffed with curried quinoa with the ocean vegetable hijiki and onions. Warming grain soups are also good, especially in winter.

Our new Body Ecology Living Cookbook is full of fresh, healthy, healing, and delicious recipes, created by Donna Gates with the Food Combining Principle in mind. You can make flavorful dishes based on these food combining guidelines at home, like Salmon with Kale Soup, Marinated Corn Salad, Stir-fried Carrots with Lime and Cumin, Quinoa Pilaf, Turkey Burgers with Sweet Mustard Sauce, and more.

Tips to wash fruits and vegetables

We as a whole realize that foods grown from the ground are a critical piece of our eating methodologies and that we ought to eat them each and every day. Nonetheless, it’s not hard to neglect washing them and ensuring that all pesticides and unsafe microbes are long gone.1 Especially with an exceptionally bustling timetable, altogether wiping off your deliver can appear like the exact opposite thing you need to do.

Take a look at these important guidelines to wash your produce effectively to eliminate harmful bacteria:

    1. Wash your own hands. For about 20 to 30 seconds with warm water and soap, wash your hands before and after touching any produce.
    2. Clean all fruits and veggies under cold running water, thoroughly, before consuming, preparing, or cutting it up. Never use soap, detergent, or even store-bought produce washes. Stick to water.
    3. For fruits like apples, pears, and peaches, that you often peel before eating or using in recipes, be sure to rinse them first anyway. This will help to avoid bringing any bacteria onto the knife you use to cut it.
    4. Dry produce after you’ve washed it. Use a dry paper towel or cloth to rid your produce of any lingering bacteria or dirt.
    5. Invest in a produce brush. You can use it for harder produce, like cucumbers, to scrub their surface and to remove microbes (tiny molecules such as things like bacteria and parasites). Make sure the brush is clean.
    6. Be sure to wash your countertops and utensils. After you have washed and/or peeled produce, and before cutting and chopping, clean the area where you are working, in order to prevent the potential spread of bacteria from the raw produce.
    7. Spray your more fragile produce. Foods like raspberries have a tendency to fall apart if placed under running water, so it is important to instead spray them with water to clean them.
    8. Soak certain produce in water for a couple of minutes. Some foods like broccoli and cauliflower have tougher areas to reach and clean at one time. Soak them in cold clean water instead.
    9. Fill a spray bottle with water on your way out the door, to clean your apples or other fruits at work or on the go

 

 

 

EPA and DHA decreased risk of many chronic diseases.

No type of fat has been getting more recent publicity than omega-3s, and you’re very likely to have seen TV ads or heard radio infomercials about this unique type of fat. However, much of the omega-3 publicity you’ve heard has probably been focused on dietary supplements rather than food. In this profile, we’ll provide you with a fresh look at omega-3s from the perspective of food and the best ways to balance your meal plan for strong omega-3 support.

Omega-3s belong to a broader group of fats called polyunsaturated fats. Sometimes you’ll hear this group called “poly” fats. The specific members of this group are called polyunsaturated fatty acids, or PUFAs. What’s most important about PUFAs—including omega-3s—is one special aspect of their chemical structure. They contain what are called “double bonds”—special connections that make them more flexible and interactive as fatty acids; they also make them more delicate and susceptible to damage. All PUFAs—including all omega-3s—contain at least two double bonds. But the position of the double bonds in omega-3s is unique and simply not found in other fats.

Some omega-3s are simpler than others. The simplest is called alpha-linolenic acid, or ALA. Like most vitamins, ALA is especially important in our diet because our bodies cannot make it from scratch. Either we consume it, or we don’t have enough. Fortunately for us, many commonly eaten plant and animal foods contain ALA.

For other omega-3s, this all-or-nothing scenario is not the case. Under the right circumstances, our bodies can usually take ALA and transform it into other omega-3s. These other omega-3s are more complicated than ALA and contain more double bonds. The best studied are EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid). EPA has five double bonds and DHA has six. In a large number of research studies, there are clear health benefits provided by EPA and DHA that are not provided by ALA. These health benefits involve support of many body systems and decreased risk of many chronic diseases.

So without question, our bodies need ALA, EPA, and DHA to stay healthy, and we need to consume ALA-containing foods no matter what because our bodies lack the ability to make ALA. But what about EPA and DHA? Are we absolutely required to eat foods containing EPA and DHA?

The answer to that question is particularly important since it can affect our entire approach to eating. If we only need to eat ALA-containing foods—and can trust our bodies to make all of the EPA and DHA that we need—we become free to choose whatever type of diet we would like, including a strict vegan diet that contains no animal foods whatsoever (including no milk, no cheese, and no eggs). That’s because a wide variety of plant foods contain small-to-moderate amounts of ALA. However, if we need to obtain EPA and DHA directly from food, we become much more restricted in our food choices. For example, if we are trying to implement a strict vegan diet with no animal foods whatsoever and want to obtain DHA from our diet, our choices would most likely be limited to sea plants (which can contain DHA) or some fermented foods (like fermented soy foods) which had been allowed to ferment with the help of specific fungi that were capable of producing DHA.