Category Archives: Food & Drink

Tips to wash fruits and vegetables

We as a whole realize that foods grown from the ground are a critical piece of our eating methodologies and that we ought to eat them each and every day. Nonetheless, it’s not hard to neglect washing them and ensuring that all pesticides and unsafe microbes are long gone.1 Especially with an exceptionally bustling timetable, altogether wiping off your deliver can appear like the exact opposite thing you need to do.

Take a look at these important guidelines to wash your produce effectively to eliminate harmful bacteria:

    1. Wash your own hands. For about 20 to 30 seconds with warm water and soap, wash your hands before and after touching any produce.
    2. Clean all fruits and veggies under cold running water, thoroughly, before consuming, preparing, or cutting it up. Never use soap, detergent, or even store-bought produce washes. Stick to water.
    3. For fruits like apples, pears, and peaches, that you often peel before eating or using in recipes, be sure to rinse them first anyway. This will help to avoid bringing any bacteria onto the knife you use to cut it.
    4. Dry produce after you’ve washed it. Use a dry paper towel or cloth to rid your produce of any lingering bacteria or dirt.
    5. Invest in a produce brush. You can use it for harder produce, like cucumbers, to scrub their surface and to remove microbes (tiny molecules such as things like bacteria and parasites). Make sure the brush is clean.
    6. Be sure to wash your countertops and utensils. After you have washed and/or peeled produce, and before cutting and chopping, clean the area where you are working, in order to prevent the potential spread of bacteria from the raw produce.
    7. Spray your more fragile produce. Foods like raspberries have a tendency to fall apart if placed under running water, so it is important to instead spray them with water to clean them.
    8. Soak certain produce in water for a couple of minutes. Some foods like broccoli and cauliflower have tougher areas to reach and clean at one time. Soak them in cold clean water instead.
    9. Fill a spray bottle with water on your way out the door, to clean your apples or other fruits at work or on the go

 

 

 

EPA and DHA decreased risk of many chronic diseases.

No type of fat has been getting more recent publicity than omega-3s, and you’re very likely to have seen TV ads or heard radio infomercials about this unique type of fat. However, much of the omega-3 publicity you’ve heard has probably been focused on dietary supplements rather than food. In this profile, we’ll provide you with a fresh look at omega-3s from the perspective of food and the best ways to balance your meal plan for strong omega-3 support.

Omega-3s belong to a broader group of fats called polyunsaturated fats. Sometimes you’ll hear this group called “poly” fats. The specific members of this group are called polyunsaturated fatty acids, or PUFAs. What’s most important about PUFAs—including omega-3s—is one special aspect of their chemical structure. They contain what are called “double bonds”—special connections that make them more flexible and interactive as fatty acids; they also make them more delicate and susceptible to damage. All PUFAs—including all omega-3s—contain at least two double bonds. But the position of the double bonds in omega-3s is unique and simply not found in other fats.

Some omega-3s are simpler than others. The simplest is called alpha-linolenic acid, or ALA. Like most vitamins, ALA is especially important in our diet because our bodies cannot make it from scratch. Either we consume it, or we don’t have enough. Fortunately for us, many commonly eaten plant and animal foods contain ALA.

For other omega-3s, this all-or-nothing scenario is not the case. Under the right circumstances, our bodies can usually take ALA and transform it into other omega-3s. These other omega-3s are more complicated than ALA and contain more double bonds. The best studied are EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid). EPA has five double bonds and DHA has six. In a large number of research studies, there are clear health benefits provided by EPA and DHA that are not provided by ALA. These health benefits involve support of many body systems and decreased risk of many chronic diseases.

So without question, our bodies need ALA, EPA, and DHA to stay healthy, and we need to consume ALA-containing foods no matter what because our bodies lack the ability to make ALA. But what about EPA and DHA? Are we absolutely required to eat foods containing EPA and DHA?

The answer to that question is particularly important since it can affect our entire approach to eating. If we only need to eat ALA-containing foods—and can trust our bodies to make all of the EPA and DHA that we need—we become free to choose whatever type of diet we would like, including a strict vegan diet that contains no animal foods whatsoever (including no milk, no cheese, and no eggs). That’s because a wide variety of plant foods contain small-to-moderate amounts of ALA. However, if we need to obtain EPA and DHA directly from food, we become much more restricted in our food choices. For example, if we are trying to implement a strict vegan diet with no animal foods whatsoever and want to obtain DHA from our diet, our choices would most likely be limited to sea plants (which can contain DHA) or some fermented foods (like fermented soy foods) which had been allowed to ferment with the help of specific fungi that were capable of producing DHA.

Deadly foods you likely have in your kitchen

What are some of the deadliest foods the world has ever seen? Poisonous or harmful by design, not accident, and something that has us questioning our sanity when we choose to take a bite?

1. Fruit Seeds

Like apples, cherry pits contain a type of hydrogen cyanide called prussic acid. Don’t go eating a cup of ground pits, or peach and apricot pits for that matter.

2. Rhubarb

Rhubarb leaves contain oxalic acid, which causes kidney stones. It’ll take 11 pounds of leaves to be fatal, but much less to make you seriously ill.

3. Nutmeg

Nutmeg is actually a hallucinogenic. Yes, you can trip on it, but it’s said that eating just 0.2 oz of nutmeg could lead to convulsions, and 0.3 oz could lead to seizures. Eating one whole will supposedly lead to a type of “nutmeg psychosis,” which includes a sense of impending doom.

4. Potatoes

Glycoalkaloids, also found in nightshade, can be found in the leaves, stems, and sprouts of potatoes. It can also build up in the potato if it’s left too long, especially in the light. Eating glycoalkaloids will lead to cramping, diarrhea, confused headaches, or even coma and death. It’s said that just 3 to 6 mg per kilogram of body weight could be fatal. Avoid potatoes with a greenish tinge.

5. Almonds

There are two variations of almonds, sweet almonds and bitter almonds. The bitter ones supposedly contain relatively large amounts of hydrogen cyanide. It’s said that even eating just 7 – 10 raw bitter almonds can cause problems for adults, and could be fatal for children.

6. Raw Honey

Because it doesn’t go through the pasteurization process in which harmful toxins are killed, unpasteurized honey often contains grayanotoxin. That can lead to dizziness, weakness, excessive sweating, nausea, and vomiting that last for 24 hours. Typically just one tablespoon of concentrated grayanotoxin can cause the symptoms above. Consuming multiple tablespoons would be a bad idea.

7. Tomatoes

The stems and leaves of tomatoes contain alkali poisons that can cause stomach agitation. Unripe green tomatoes have been said to have the same effect. You would need to consume vast quantities for it to be fatal. Not exactly high-risk, but you might avoid eating tomato leaves.

8. Tuna

The danger in tuna is the mercury that the fish absorbs. Once in your body, mercury will either pass through your kidneys, or travel to your brain and supposedly drive you insane. The FDA recommends children and pregnant women do not consume tuna at all. While it’s unlikely that eating a massive amount of tuna in one sitting will kill you, it’s a good idea to monitor your weekly intake.

9. Cassava

The leaves and roots of cassava are surprisingly rich in cyanide. By this point, we may as well wish cyanide were the most delicious, sumptuous substance on the planet if we had to die to enjoy a bite… there is not much in the way of flavor, though. Cassava is a tropical vegetable originally from South America, but has gained popularity in Africa, particularly for its juice, which can be fermented to produce a drink called piwarry.

10. Cashews

Raw cashews you might find in a supermarket are not actually raw, as they’ve been steamed to remove the urushiol, a chemical also found in poison ivy. This chemical can cause the same effect as poison ivy, or poison oak. High levels of urushiol can supposedly prove fatal. People who are allergic to poison ivy are likely to have a fatal allergic reaction to eating actual raw cashews.

Start eating dark chocolate

Healthy food is a standout amongst the most essential elements for keeping the body to keep it sound and fit. These days, a large number of us who couldn’t care less about what is required by the body and can just consider cause of totality just at breakfast, lunch and supper. Indeed, the human body needs an assortment of essential supplements contained in the nourishment expended for wellbeing. Things being what they are, what sustenance was appropriate and best to guarantee that the body is constantly sound for the duration of the day?

Choosing nutritious foods and contain a variety of nutrients to the body is easy bother. This is because, different types of food in consumption usually contain nutrients that are good for only one organ. So it is very important to know the different types of food that is needed by all the organs of your body. Health tips, here’s the best food for a healthy body

 1. Different types of fruits. Fruits are excellent for nourishing your body. This is because, various fruits are a source of fiber and vitamin C which serves to keep the immune system to keep it healthy, fit and fit throughout the day.
Various types of fish. This is because, different types of fish such as tuna and sardines contain lots of omega 3 fatty acids Omega 3 fatty acid that serves to maintain the health of your heart organ.

2. Assorted greens. Spinach is one very important food for the nutritional requirements needed by the organs of the brain. This is because, spinach contain vitamin B9 that play a role in improving memory skills associated with intelligence itself.

 3. Carrot. This is one food that is needed by the body to nourish the organs khususunya your vision. This is because, the carrot is a source of vitamin A and beta carotene which acts kebuhan sufficient nutrition for you who want a healthy eye organ.

4. Avocado, one fruit is also very good for maintaining a healthy body, especially your kidneys. This is because, avocado is one of the foods that contain very high source of dietary fiber. So for a healthy kidney, begin loved the avocado from now.

 5. Mustard greens. This is one kind of vegetable that is excellent consumed to keep the liver in order to function optimally. Various other food was very good to nourish the liver that is under the red and white onions, cabbage, soy and red wine.

6. Dark chocolate, This is one of the foods that are excellent for keeping your blood pressure remained normal. So for those of you who are afraid of the rise and fall of blood pressure, so start eating dark chocolate.

Organic food as meaning earth friendly?

Organic is fundamentally a marking term that is utilized on a wide assortment of nourishments that have been created through techniques and practices affirmed by the U.S. Division of Agriculture (USDA) and its National Organics Program (NOP). Natural is likewise one of the absolute best strides you can take to shield the nature of your nourishment. As a rule, natural is likewise great stride for the earth.

Many people think about “organic” as meaning “earth friendly.” Even though this meaning often holds true, it doesn’t always. Organic regulations focus on farming practices and food production steps that can be monitored and controlled to decrease risk of food contamination and improve food quality. But for the most part, organic regulations simply do not try to address more complicated issues involving the earth and sustainability.

Here is one simple example of the difference between the focus of organic regulations and a focus on sustainability. In the U.S., we currently plant about 92 million acres of corn, 78 million acres of soybeans, and 57 million acres of wheat. Ecologists view these 227 million acres and the way they are planted as non-sustainable. Many factors combine to make our current planting of corn and soybeans and wheat non-sustainable. Included are factors like natural water cycles and natural mineral cycles in North America and their inability to accommodate the 227 million acres of these three crops as currently cultivated. The USDA’s organics program does not address or evaluate the sustainability of these crop acres. The program limits its focus to the farming steps that would be needed in order for all 227 million acres of corn and soybeans and wheat to be certified as organic. For example, USDA organic guidelines would prohibit use of genetic engineering, fertilization with sewage sludge, and irradiation on any of these acres. Such changes would most likely improve the quality of the crops and the quality of the land. But the practice of planting 227 million acres with these three crops would still be non-sustainable, and this non-sustainability would not matter from the USDA’s perspective. Provided that USDA organic requirements were met, these crops would be labeled organic regardless of their sustainability. The bottom line here is simple: organic food production is better for the environment and better for our health than conventional food production methods, but important earth-related questions like sustainability are not typically addressed in organic regulations and might not be furthered by adoption of organic standards.

Of special importance in organics are the “big three.” Genetic engineering, irradiation, and sewage sludge are sometimes referred to as “the big three” by commentators on the National Organics Program, since they are practices that can have an especially problematic impact on health and the environment. The “big three” have always been – and are still – prohibited by organic regulations. Along with prohibition of these three practices, however, a wide variety of other practices are prohibited in production of organic food. For example, most synthetic chemicals (including most synthetic pesticides, herbicides, and fertilizers) are prohibited by organic regulations. All off these prohibitions in organic food production are important. They help to safeguard the quality of our food and to reduce our health risk from food contaminants.

Black pepper

A squeeze of black pepper is added to practically every kind of formula possible. Once utilized as money and exhibited to the divine beings as a hallowed offering, it is lucky this most mainstream of flavors is accessible consistently.

Dark pepper originates from the pepper plant, a smooth woody vine that can grow up to 33 feet in hot and moist tropical atmospheres. They start to shoulder little white grouped blooms following 3 to 4 years and form into berries known as peppercorns. Ground peppercorns deliver the flavor we call pepper.

Improve Digestion and Promote Intestinal Health

Black pepper (Piper nigrum)stimulates the taste buds in such a way that an alert is sent to to the stomach to increase hydrochloric acid secretion, thereby improving digestion. Hydrochloric acid is necessary for the digestion of proteins and other food components in the stomach. When the body’s production of hydrochloric acid is insufficient, food may sit in the stomach for an extended period of time, leading to heartburn or indigestion, or it may pass into the intestines, where it can be used as a food source for unfriendly gut bacteria, whose activities produce gas, irritation, and/or diarrhea or constipation.

Black pepper has long been recognized as a carminitive, (a substance that helps prevent the formation of intestinal gas), a property likely due to its beneficial effect of stimulating hydrochloric acid production. In addition, black pepper has diaphoretic (promotes sweating), and diuretic (promotes urination) properties.

Black pepper has demonstrated impressive antioxidant and antibacterial effects–yet another way in which this wonderful seasoning promotes the health of the digestive tract. And not only does black pepper help you derive the most benefit from your food, the outer layer of the peppercorn stimulates the breakdown of fat cells, keeping you slim while giving you energy to burn.

How to Select and Store

Black pepper is available whole, crushed or ground into powder. To ensure best flavor, buy whole peppercorns and grind them yourself in a mill just before adding to a recipe. In addition to superior flavor, buying whole peppercorns will help to ensure that you are purchasing unadulterated pepper since ground pepper is oftentimes mixed with other spices. Whole peppercorns should be heavy, compact and free of any blemishes.

Even through dried herbs and spices like black pepper are widely available in supermarkets, you may want to explore the local spice stores in your area. Oftentimes, these stores feature an expansive selection of dried herbs and spices that are of superior quality and freshness than those offered in regular markets. Just like with other dried spices, when purchasing black pepper try to select that which is organically grown since this will give you more assurance that it has not been irradiated (among other potential adverse effects, irradiating black pepper may lead to a significant decrease in its vitamin C content.)

Black pepper should be kept in a tightly sealed glass container in a cool, dark and dry place. Whole peppercorns will keep almost indefinitely, while ground pepper will stay fresh for about three months. Pepper can also be frozen although this will make its flavor more pronounced.

A Few Quick Serving Ideas

  • Coat steaks with crushed peppercorns before cooking to create the classic dish, steak au poivre.
  • As the pungent taste of black pepper is a natural complement to the deep, berry-like flavor of venison, use it to flavor this meat when preparing venison steaks or venison stews.
  • Keep a pepper mill on your dining table so that you can add its intense spark to a host of different recipes that you prepare.
  • Olive oil, lemon juice, salt and cracked pepper make a delicious salad dressing.

Best and worst salad

A few years back I wrote up a rundown of New Year’s resolutions on a little bit of cardstock, overlaid it, and place it in my wallet. On that rundown was the determination to eat a plate of mixed greens each day, just in light of the fact that eating serving of mixed greens constantly made me feel like I was benefiting something for myself. All things considered, serving of mixed greens gives a few vitamins and can top you off while lessening your caloric admission. What could be more advantageous than a major, crisp serving of mixed greens?

Unfortunately, many things, as I later found out. Salads can run the gamut of healthiness, depending on what is in them. Although that big bowl of greens may be packed full of antioxidants and fiber, it can also be laden with fat, cholesterol, and sodium—not to mention an overabundance of calories. Some restaurant salads can even contain more calories than a cheeseburger!

Luckily, like most things in life, a salad is the outcome of several small decisions. To make sure you don’t sabotage your healthy diet unintentionally, choose wisely the next time you order a salad from a restaurant or visit the salad bar. When dining out, don’t be afraid to ask questions, make special requests (extra veggies, dressing on the side, light cheese) and ask about substitutions (like grilled chicken for breaded). Most restaurants will be happy to accommodate you as long as their kitchen is stocked with the ingredients you want. Here’s how to choose wisely next time you’re making a salad at home or choosing one from a menu.

Lettuce
The foundation of most salads, lettuce adds substance, crunch, water, and fiber for very few calories—only about 10 per cup. But if you want all that and vitamins, too, toss out the iceberg and toss in the romaine, mixed baby greens and spinach. While iceberg lettuce is lower in nutrients (and still makes a decent choice if it’s the only thing available), these other greens are rich in vitamins A, C and K, manganese, and folate.

Protein
Adding protein, such as lean meat, tofu, eggs or beans, will help bulk up your salad and keep you full longer. Unfortunately, many protein toppings are deep-fried, breaded and greasy, which adds unnecessary calories plus cholesterol, sodium and fat to your salad. Skimp on fattier toppings such as bacon and fried (breaded) chicken strips, and go for lean proteins instead. Grilled chicken, canned beans of all kinds, chickpeas, tofu, hardboiled eggs (especially whites), or water-packed tuna are leaner choices. Nuts and seeds are popular in salads, too, and while they’re a healthy source of good fats and some protein, they’re not exactly low-cal. If you choose to add them, watch your portions (1/2 ounce contains more than 80 calories).

Cheese
Restaurants know that people love cheese, so they tend to pile on multiple servings of it on their salads. It might be tasty, but it sends the calorie counts sky high! While cheese is a nutritious food that adds flavor, calcium, and protein to a salad, enjoy it in moderation due to its high fat content. Just a half-cup of cheddar cheese (the amount on many large restaurant salads) contains 18 grams of fat and 225 calories. To keep calories in check, use a single serving of cheese (approximately 2 tablespoons). Choose low-fat varieties as much as possible to save on saturated fat and calories. A smaller amount of a stronger-flavored cheese, such as Brie, feta, chevre, gorgonzola, sharp cheddar or bleu cheese will go a long way in helping you cut down on your portions.

Pile on the Veggies
Vegetables like bell peppers, grated carrots, sugar snap peas, and tomatoes provide flavor, fiber, and vitamins for few calories. Grated carrots, for example, have only 45 calories in a whole cup, and there are only about 20 calories in an entire red bell pepper. When building your best salad, use as many veggies as possible for extra filling power—and a nice crunch! Practice moderation when it comes to starchy vegetable toppings like corn and potatoes, which are higher in calories. And remember to go for a variety of colors to ensure you’re getting several different nutrients and antioxidants in your salad bowl.

Don’t Forget the Fruit
Don’t leave fruit on the sidelines! Fresh, canned and dried fruits add a sweetness that can help temper the slightly bitter taste of greens and veggies. They also provide color and texture (not to mention nutrition) to your salad bowl. Chopped apples, pears, grapes, or mandarin oranges (canned in juice—not syrup—and drained) are excellent salad toppers. Chewy dried fruits (cranberries, raisins) work well, too, but they are also high in calories (so only use a sprinkle!). Avocados (and the guacamole made from them) are creamy and nutritious thanks to their heart-healthy fats, but they’re also a concentrated sources of calories. Keep your use of avocado to a minimum if you’re watching your weight.

Crunchy Toppings
Sesame sticks, crispy noodles and croutons are salty and crunchy but conceal lot of hidden fat. Better options include water chestnuts, apple slivers, a small serving of nuts, crumbled whole-grain crackers, and homemade croutons. To make your own low-fat croutons, just slice a large clove of garlic and rub it over both sides of a piece of whole-grain bread. Cut the bread into cubes and then brown it in the toaster or conventional oven.

Dressing
A very healthy salad could go very wrong with one too many shakes of oil or dressing. The main issue with dressing is its fat and sodium content—and the fact that people have trouble controlling their portions. Two tablespoons is an appropriate serving of dressing, but most restaurants serve much more than that, whether mixed in to your salad or served on the side. Those calories add up fast. When dining out, always ask for dressing on the side and dip your fork into the dressing before picking up your bite of salad. Caesar, ranch and other cream-based dressings (when not specified as low-fat) are calorie bombs worth avoiding. Look for dressings specified as “low-fat” that contain no more than 60 calories per serving. You can also add flavor for minimal calories by using salsa, vinegar or lemon juice.

Healthy smoothie

A smoothie can be breakfast, a nibble, or a pre-or post-workout refueling device. Whether you arrange from your neighborhood Whole Foods Market juice bar or shop for fixings and mix at home, these chilly drinks are a delectable approach to include additional supplements into your every day schedule. Perused on for our master tips, traps and smoothie shopping records.

Whole fruits and vegetables are great building blocks for your smoothies, but consider adding ingredients or supplement powders that offer up additional benefits.  Some examples:

Protein

Adding protein to your blended drinks helps you feel fuller longer — especially helpful if your smoothie is the key part of your meal. Here are easy ways to add extra protein:

Add whole food sources of protein to your smoothie. Consider yogurt, kefir, nut butters, pasteurized egg whites, or silken tofu to bring richness and flavor to your glass. If you like a thicker, heartier texture boost your smoothie by blending in ground chia, flax seeds, hemp seeds or rolled oats.

Add a scoop of plant-based protein powder, which can derive protein from brown rice, hemp seed, peas or soy. A few of our favorites from our Whole Body department:

  • Garden of Life Raw Organic Meal
  • Vega Sport Performance Protein (Plant-Based)
  • Amazing Grass Protein Superfood

Add a scoop of protein powder derived from animal sources like whey, egg whites or casein. A few of our favorites from our Whole Body department:

  • Whole Foods Market Grass Fed Whey Protein Powder
  • 365 Everyday ValueÒ Whey Protein Powder
  • Iron Tek Essential Protein (Whey+)

Superfood Powders

Reach for superfood powders to boost your smoothie with extra nutrients. Here are a few of our favorites:

  • Navitas Naturals Acai
  • Navitas Naturals Maca
  • Amazing Grass Detox and Digest

Veggies 

Try fresh or frozen spinach leaves, fresh or frozen kale leaves, carrot, cooked sweet potato, cooked winter squash and pumpkin, beet greens and cooked beets and/or cucumber. Arugula, dandelion and mustard greens are also excellent nutrient-dense greens, but can be too bitter for some.

Fruits

Try berries, peaches and nectarines, pears and apples, banana, avocado, pineapple, mango, papaya, kiwi, citrus, figs, plums, melons and/or cherries. Almost all fruit can be used either fresh or frozen. (Find out why eating colorful fruits and veggies can help you make sure you’re eating

Classic garlic tea

There are thousands, of recipes that include garlic. However, the best way to absorb garlic’s health benefits is to consume it raw. Raw garlic can be a little intense for some, but there are several ways to dull the piquancy while retaining the full health benefits. My favorite is to add raw garlic to a dressing like the lemon garlic dressing used in this cabbage wedge recipe or the balsamic vinaigrette of this green bean salad.

Although it may sound a little odd to those who haven’t tried it, you can actually drink garlic. For a fast immune system boost, I like to prepare a garlic tea:

Ingredients

  • 1 clove organic garlic
  • ½ lime or lemon, juiced
  • 1 tsp raw organic honey

Directions

  1. Slice 1 clove of organic garlic very thinly.
  2. Boil one cup of water.
  3. Place sliced garlic in a cup.
  4. Pour the hot water over the garlic and cover the cup with a small plate.
  5. Let it sit for 10 minutes.
  6. Add the juice of half a lime.
  7. Add half a spoon of raw organic honey.

If tea isn’t your thing, I have another emergency immune booster. In my opinion, this one is less tasty than the tea, but it gets the job done. Mince two cloves of garlic, mix it with the juice of ten limes, and drink it. If it’s too harsh, add a little fresh orange juice to soften the flavor.

More research may be needed, but it’s already clear that garlic is an incredible superfood with amazing health benefits. Our ancestors knew this, and we’re now rediscovering the full power of this pungent vegetable. If you’re feeling under the weather, eat a couple cloves of raw garlic. It could alleviate what ails you, though your friends, family, and coworkers may prefer you avoid any close-talking afterward.

Garlic is Best Medicine

Garlic (Allium sativum) is a plant used in cooking and medicine, best known for its distinctive flavor and aroma. While frequently used as a seasoning, garlic is technically a vegetable. A member of the Allium family, it’s a close relative of onions, shallots, leeks, and chives. The benefits of garlic don’t end with adding flavor to food, it’s a legitimate superfood that has been used for an astounding variety of medical applications for thousands of years.

Health Benefits of Garlic

1. Garlic Supports Cardiovascular Health

Garlic is among the best foods for heart health. Studies have found that garlic reduces cholesterol and lowers lipid content in the blood. Experimental and clinical studies on the cardiovascular benefits of garlic have found it to have a positive effect on atherosclerosis, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, and thrombosis.[1] Garlic also seems to possess the ability to prevent blood clots. Tests are currently underway to examine the mechanism of this effect.

2. Garlic May Help with Hypertension

Researchers have found that oral administration of garlic can lower blood pressure in both human and animal studies. Amazingly, there was a measurable response after just a single dose. Chronic oral administration of garlic has a long-term positive effect. Allicin seems to have a relaxing effect on the smooth muscle cells of the pulmonary artery, allowing the artery to open more fully.[1] This doesn’t mean that you can switch to an all-bacon diet and expect to “garlic away” the consequences, but when combined with a balanced diet, garlic can substantially improve blood pressure.

3. Garlic Is Nutritional Support Against Cancer

Around the world, studies have found a correlation between a high intake of garlic and a lowered cancer risk. An increased consumption of garlic is associated with a reduction in cancers of the stomach, colon, esophagus, pancreas, prostate, and breast. The United States National Cancer Institute has said that garlic may be the most effective food for cancer prevention.

4. Garlic and Diabetes

Garlic may also provide significant benefits to those suffering from diabetes. Experimental studies have shown that garlic lowers blood glucose levels and this hypoglycemic effect has been replicated in animal studies. Treatment for humans is less studied but looks promising. Garlic has been reported to lower blood cholesterol levels and reduce insulin resistance. However, further study is needed to fully understand the effect garlic has on human blood glucose levels.

5. Garlic Offers Liver Protection

Garlic is one of the best foods to help cleanse your liver. It can help mitigate the effects of fatty liver disease[4] and provides hepatoprotective effects from certain toxic agents. Studies have found that garlic can protect liver cells from acetaminophen, gentamycin, and nitrates.

6. Antimicrobial Properties of Garlic

For centuries, traditional medicine has used garlic for its antimicrobial properties. Modern studies have found that the antibacterial properties of garlic are effective on salmonella, staph infections, clostridium (the cause of botulism), proteus, mycobacterium, and H. pylori. Garlic has even been suggested as a treatment for drug-resistant tuberculosis.

Garlic’s action against harmful organisms doesn’t stop with bacteria. It’s antiprotozoal, antifungal, and even antiviral. In vitro studies have found that garlic is effective against influenza, cytomegalovirus, rhinovirus (the cause of the common cold), viral pneumonia, rotavirus, herpes simplex 1 and 2, and even HIV. Unfortunately, these results are only confirmed in test tube studies. How the active substances of garlic react to viruses inside the human system remains to be seen.

Studies of cold sufferers have found that those who consumed garlic extract experienced milder symptoms and shorter illness duration than placebo groups, but the exact mechanism behind this phenomena is still unclear. Further research is necessary to more fully understand the healing power of garlic.

7. Garlic Is a Powerful Antioxidant

Free radicals are unstable molecules that damage DNA and lead to poor health. Garlic contains potent antioxidants that fight these free radicals. When allicin breaks down, it produces an acid that reacts with and traps the free radicals. Researchers at Queens University in Ontario believe this may be the most powerful dietary antioxidant ever discovered.